Susan Revis - William Raveis R.E. & Home Services


If you’re hunting for a new home and have come across one that fits all of your requirements and more, it can seem like the only thing you can do is make an offer and wait.

However, your first choice could also be another buyer’s dream home. And, if a higher bid isn’t feasible, you have to find other ways to win over the seller. One way this can be achieved is through writing a letter to the owner of the home.

If you’re bidding on your dream home, writing a letter the the owner can be anxiety inducing. Choosing what to reveal and finding the right words can be scary, even for the most seasoned writer.

So, in this article we’re going to walk you through writing a letter to a seller to give you the best possible chance of winning the bid for a new home.

Tell them why you love their home

If you’ve fallen in love with certain aspects of the home, there’s a good chance the sellers did too. Be personal in your explanations. Rather than just say you love the location, mention that it is a perfect distance to walk to the playground with your children or pets. This will help buyers better understand you and your story.

If you have family who lives nearby, or if the home has features that can greatly improve the life of you, your family, or your pets, be sure to mention this in the letter as well.

Don’t press or plead, just be polite

It can seem desperate and off-putting to receive a letter pleading with you to sell your home to someone. So, when you’re writing your letter and you come to the end, simply thank the buyer for their time and for reading, compliment them once more, and wish them luck in their new home.

Revise and review

It can be tempting to send your letter immediately after writing it, especially if writing is you don’t like writing in general. However, it’s always a good idea to revise. I suggest writing your letter one night, then reading it again the next evening to give yourself time and distance from it--this way you’ll be reading it with fresh eyes and will be able to find any wording that sounds strange or confusing.

It’s also a good idea to run your writing through a free proofreader like Grammarly. And, finally, there is no substitute for having an editor. Ask one of your friends or family members to read the letter and give you feedback.

Stand out from the crowd

There are a few things you can include in your letter to set you apart from other potential buyers. Including a family photo will help the sellers put a face to the names you mention in the letter.

It can also be helpful to print and mail the letter, rather than sending it electronically. Since we so rarely receive a physical copy of a letter these days (unless it’s from a bill collector), it can be nice to receive something positive in the mail for a change.


A home inspection enables a buyer to examine a residence and identify any underlying structural issues. Plus, the assessment allows a buyer to receive a report that details a home inspector's findings to help him or her determine how to proceed in the homebuying journey.

Ultimately, it helps to prepare as much as possible before you conduct a home inspection. If you allocate time and resources to get ready for a home inspection, you'll be better equipped than ever before to achieve the best-possible inspection results.

Let's take a look at three tips to help you prepare for a home inspection.

1. Hire an Expert Home Inspector

There is no shortage of home inspectors for hire in cities and towns nationwide. However, differentiating an average home inspector from an expert one can be difficult.

When it comes to getting ready for a home inspection, it pays to hire an expert to assess a residence both inside and out. Because if you have an expert home inspector at your side, you can learn about myriad home problems before you finalize a house purchase.

To find an expert home inspector, it helps to reach out to home inspectors in your area. Learn about each home inspector's expertise and ask for client referrals. After you perform an extensive evaluation of home inspectors, you can hire an expert home inspector to assess any residence, at any time.

2. Develop a Game Plan

If you want to achieve the optimal results during a home inspection, it helps to enter the inspection with a plan in hand. That way, you can evaluate all aspects of a residence and improve your chances of identifying both minor and major home issues.

Ensure your home inspection plan includes assessments of a house's interior and exterior, as well as a residence's attic, basement and roof. Also, you should test a home's heating and cooling system during an inspection.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

A home inspection may prove to be difficult if you fail to plan accordingly. Luckily, if you hire a real estate agent, you can get the support you need to maximize the value of a home inspection.

Typically, a real estate agent will guide you along the homebuying journey. Once a seller accepts your offer on a home, a real estate agent can put you in touch with the best home inspectors in your area. Then, you, your real estate agent and your home inspector can work together to perform a successful home evaluation.

A real estate agent will provide plenty of assistance after a home inspection too. And if you are uncertain about how to proceed with a house after an inspection, a real estate agent can offer recommendations to help you make an informed decision.

Want to take the guesswork out of a home inspection? Use the aforementioned tips, and you can prepare for an upcoming home inspection.


Want to add your house to the real estate market? If you're operating in a seller's market, you may be able to generate plenty of interest in your house as soon as your residence becomes available.

A seller's market commonly features an abundance of homebuyers and a shortage of home sellers. As such, a home seller who lists a high-quality residence in a seller's market could earn a significant profit.

Operating in a seller's market offers many opportunities for home sellers who prepare accordingly. Lucky for you, we're here to ensure you can get the best price for your residence in a seller's market.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you optimize the value of your house in a seller's market.

1. Complete a Home Appraisal

A home appraisal will help you understand your house's strengths and weaknesses. That way, you can perform any home improvement projects before you list your residence. You may be able to boost your chances of a quick property sale too.

Typically, a home appraisal requires just a few hours to complete. A home appraiser will visit your residence and inspect it both inside and out. Then, this appraiser will provide you with a report that details your home's condition.

Review the results of a home appraisal report closely. By doing so, you can prioritize various home improvements and work toward transforming your ordinary residence into one that will stand out in a seller's market.

2. Analyze the Housing Market

How does your residence stack up against comparable houses that are currently available? Examine the housing market to find out.

Evaluate the prices of houses that are similar to your own. This may help you establish a realistic price range for your residence.

Also, look at how long recently sold properties were available before they were purchased. This may help you understand how long it might take for you to get the best price for your residence in a seller's market.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

When it comes to selling a home, there is no reason to embark on the property selling journey on your own. Thankfully, real estate agents are available in cities and towns nationwide, and these housing market experts are happy to assist you in any way they can.

A real estate agent can provide details about what to expect before you add your residence to a seller's market. He or she will help you plan ahead and ensure your residence features an awe-inspiring exterior and flawless interior that differentiate your property from others.

Moreover, a real estate agent will help you alleviate stress throughout the home selling journey. This housing market professional can respond to your home selling concerns and questions and provide plenty of guidance to help you make informed decisions.

There is no need to leave anything to chance when you list your home in a seller's market. Instead, take advantage of the aforementioned tips, and you should have no trouble stirring up interest in your house.


A growing trend in interior design is to put wood flooring in the kitchen. If this seems counter-intuitive to you, you're not the only one. After all, the risk of damage from traffic, water, spills, stains, and even burns could certainly give one pause. But mainly to accommodate the free-flow open-concept designs and create a visually seamless aspect, wood floors are popping up in both new builds and pricey renovations. Plus, wood is warmer under bare feet on cold mornings, and it just looks nice. 

If you’ve wondered how a wood floor will work in your kitchen, remember the following points about wood floors.ol>

  • Not all wood is the same. Solid wood flooring might come from a hard species or a soft species. While a specific color or grain might attract you, a softer wood is subject to scratches and dents from street shoes, stools or chairs, tables, and heavy appliances such as the refrigerator. While solid wood allows for some repair and refinishing, a harder wood lasts longer and requires less care. Wood floor hardness ratings called the Janka Scale, place firs and pines in the softer category and gums and teaks at the top.
  • Standing water is not your friend. While finished hardwood flooring holds up well to cleaning with a damp mop, standing water that seeps between the planks causes the wood to swell and warp. Wipe up spills and standing water immediately. For the same reason, don’t use a steam floor cleaner. Check around sinks and under the dishwasher and refrigerator for leaks that could damage your floor.
  • Take special care when moving heavy appliances or furniture. Place heavy cardboard or a rug under the wheels or feet and slide it into place to protect the wood from deep grooves, dents, or scratches.
  • Use area rugs under tables and chairs to avoid scratching from constant use. 
  • What about bamboo? Technically, bamboo is a grass, not a hardwood. However, most flooring outlets sell it as hardwood. Compared to most, it is two to three times harder, including oak, so it is an excellent option for flooring. Bamboo floors install the same as hardwood and are more resistant to water and other liquids (although no hardwood, including bamboo, is waterproof).
  • If you’re thinking of placing hardwood in your kitchen during an upcoming renovation, ask your neighborhood real estate professional if hardwood is trending in your area.




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